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August 09 2017

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These are the most visited cards from DW Blast.

A bit of a window into the popularity of these characters, I think. Maybe somewhat of an indication regarding who might join the cast.

Take note of Chengpu (on there TWICE) and Man Chong.

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daolunofshiji:

Latest scans thrown together, Xiahou Yuan, Xiao and Da Qiao, Xun You, Zhang Fei, Lu Lingqi and Zhuge Liang

Very surprised Lü Bu doesn’t make his daughter put on pants when she leaves the house.

“Lingqi, go home and change! You can’t go to the battle dressed like that!”

“Dad I’m a grown-ass woman and can wear what I want.”

“I can see your labia. Go change.”

We go through this every time DW’s version of the Qiao sisters comes up, but once again:

If you send me messages defending the pedos (”It’s a cultural thing!!! ヽ(ಠ_ಠ)ノ  You’re a racist if it bothers you!”), I’m not going to engage in that conversation. Your message will be instantly deleted. I can hit delete faster than you can type, so you’re wasting more of your time than mine.

FYI if you want to keep track of what’s going on regarding videos like Sanguo and Dynasty Rants, the most consistent place to get information is going to be the TacitalError twitter.

https://twitter.com/TacitalError

While the website (scheduled to come online on Thursday/Friday) will have news posts with significant chunks of information, the twitter will be quicker and more active. So if you want to stay up to date and ask some questions about what’s going on, that’s the place to do it.

August 08 2017

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daolunofshiji:

WAT

Jiang Wei dicked up so bad he died twice.

Xun Yu & Xun You

Lots of confusion over how Xun Yu and Xun You are related. Good thing I specialize in inconsequential details. They’re usually described as either uncle and nephew, or as cousins. Neither is quite right, although cousins is closer.

Xun Shu had eight sons. Among them was Xun Gun, who was the father of Xun Yu. Xun Shu had a nephew (his brother’s son) named Xun Tan. He had a son named Xun Yi, who was the father of Xun You.

So Xun Yu’s great-grandfather was Xun You’s great-great grandfather. This makes the two of them something like 4th cousins, once removed. So calling them uncle and nephew isn’t right at all, the relationship was far too distant for that. Cousins is correct in the broad sense, though it typically implies a blood relation closer than what they actually possessed.

It’s probably best to just call them “kinsmen”. They were from the same clan in Yingchuan, and they certainly regarded each other as family. But the usual terms imply a closeness that just asn’t there.

Not to imply that they weren’t on close terms personally. They had a lot in common and worked well together for many years. When Cao Cao asked Xun Yu to recommend skilled people he knew, Xun You was one of the first ones he thought of. They were close - just not by blood.

*If you rebloged an earlier version of this, please delete it. I made an error that @siumerghe pointed out. It is now corrected.

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So, looks like Xun You has been added.

My initial reaction is joy. He was a great man who never gets anywhere near the credit he deserves. I’m happy to see him finally getting his due. I’m a little nervous that KT might be biting off more than they can chew (with Xun Yu, Guo Jia, Xun You, Jia Xu, Sima Yi, and Man Chong all together) but we’ll have to wait and see.

I like his design, and I think I like his weapon. He’s probably one of the first characters I’ll try out.

I do have to admit that I’m surprised, though. I didn’t think there was much of a push for him to be added, or a pressing need. Xun Yu, sure, but most people don’t appreciate Xun You. It should be very fun watching those two work together, though. Hopefully DW manages to include Xun You’s own attempt to kill Dong Zhuo.

As for Xun You vs. Guo Jia, I’d say they were equally important. Everything they did, they pretty much did together.

Hmm…a bunch of messages. New character? Let’s find out.

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daolunofshiji:

Ma Chao betrayed the minority tribes and lacked courage; he was a disappointment for his people, what a pity!
― Chen Shou  

August 07 2017

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Sometimes I remember that Koei’s Jian Yong is a sex god while the one in my novel more closely resembles a sack of potatoes, and I don’t know which of us made the mistake.

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daolunofshiji:

Jiang Wei was unrefined in letters and strategy. His ambition was to establish his works and reputation, and he manipulated the masses and went forth [on campaigns]. Good judgement was not obtained, and in the end, it led to his downfall. The Laozi says, “Governing a large state is like cooking a small fish.” How could he be so petty in all aspects and cause so much chaos?
― Chen Shou

3K Dating Sim Where Wang Ping Asks You To Read To Him

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daolunofshiji:

I didn’t notice those choices… I feel ripped off.

August 06 2017

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August 05 2017

The Great River Campaign (223)

One of the largest and most important battles in the Three Kingdoms era is also one of the most ignored. In 223, Cao Pi commissioned a massive invasion of Wu, attacking on three fronts along the Yangzi - then known as the Dajiang or Great River. Sun Quan scrambled to reinforce these positions. Over the next several months, some of the greatest generals of Wu and Wei battled furiously for control of several key positions in a struggle that would determine the shape of the Three Kingdoms for decades to come.

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In 217, Sun Quan gave his nominal surrender to Cao Cao. Cao Cao confirmed him as the hegemon of the various territories he claimed, while Sun Quan recognized him as the legitimate representative of Han. In 219, their combined forces took Jing from Liu Bei, establishing the territories of the Three Kingdoms.

Sun Quan maintained this alliance after Cao Pi came to power. As Cao Pi took his father’s place as King of Wei, Sun Quan sent him various gifts as tribute, including prisoners of war who had been captured in 219. When Cao Pi dethroned Liu Xie and formed the Wei dynasty, Sun Quan again sent tribute and acknowledged his legitimacy. However, he granted Cao Pi no territorial concessions and remained independent, as he had done under Cao Cao. Although Cao Pi wished to bring Sun Quan to heel, he was not in a position to do so at the time.

Conflict was inevitable but slow to come. In the north, Cao Pi busied himself securing his reign. He dealt with tribal revolts in the west, retook the Xincheng region from Shu, soothed Han loyalists within the court, and established the laws and protocols of Wei at home. In the south, Sun Quan conducted administrative rearrangements of his own. These included establishing a new headquarters in Jing at the centrally-located city of ‘A, which he renamed Wuchang. His immediate problem, however, was Liu Bei. In hopes of retaking Jing, Liu Bei invaded in 221. Sun Quan sent an army under Lu Xun to intercept him, and the two struggles for control of the Yidu region into 222.

In the face of Liu Bei’s invasion, Sun Quan did anything he could to placate Cao Pi and delay an attack from the north. He sent ambassadors to Wei to declare his formal submission. In return, Cao Pi named Sun Quan as King of Wu. This pacified Cao Pi briefly, but he knew that despite Sun Quan’s surrender, he had no means by which to enforce his authority. What Cao Pi most desired was a hostage to guarantee Sun Quan’s loyalty. He requested that Sun Quan send his son Sun Deng to the capital under various pretenses, but Sun Quan always gave polite excuses to put Cao Pi off.

After Sun Quan’s victory over Liu Bei in august of 222, Cao Pi recognized that his opportunity to seize control was quickly vanishing. He sent repeated demands that Sun Deng be delivered to Xuchang, but Sun Quan continued to offer polite refusal. Recognizing that the situation was growing out of his grasp, Cao Pi ordered his armies to advance south and force the issue. He sent a final letter to Sun Quan reading: “When Sun Deng comes in the morning, I shall recall my troops in the evening of that same day.” In response, Sun Quan declared a complete break from Wei. Although he still only called himself a king, he now ruled as an emperor in his own right.

Not all of Cao Pi’s officials supported his plans. Jia Xu, in particular, voiced objections to the campaign. He pointed out that although Wei was stronger than Wu and Shu, both were protected by advantageous terrain and possessed generals who knew how to capitalize on those defenses. Rather, Jia Xu urged Cao Pi to rely on diplomatic measures to secure Sun Quan’s loyalty. Cao Pi, however, regarded his prior diplomatic efforts as failure enough and began the campaign nonetheless.

The Great River Campaign proceeded on three fronts. In the west, an army led by Cao Zhen attacked Jiangling, which was defended by Zhu Ran. Jiangling was of key strategic importance. It was north of the Yangzi, making it vulnerable to Wei’s aggression. Capturing the city would grant Wei control over the upper course of the river. It would also allow Wei forces to cross south at will. Additionally, Sun Quan would be cut off from the important cities of Yiling/Xiling, Zigui, and Wu. With these cities in its possession, Wei would be able to threaten Shu on two fronts and launch attacks from north and east. It would also cut off Wu’s ability to attack Wei’s holdings in upper Jing, such as Fan and Xiangyang. Additionally, Jiangling had only recently come under Sun Quan’s control, in 219. Cao Pi had reason to believe that elements within the city would be willing to turn on their relatively new overlord, as they had turned against Guan Yu in 219 and Cao Ren in 210.

In the east, an army led by Cao Ren attacked Ruxu, defended by Zhu Huan. Ruxu was one of sun Quan’s most important strategic positions. It had a large, fortified harbor that housed a significant fleet. Sun Quan frequently used this fleet to attack Wei’s positions in northern Yang. If Cao Pi captured Ruxu, he would isolate Wu’s civilian capital Jianye and control the lower reaches of the Yangzi. Ruxu successfully withstood significant attacks by Cao Cao in 213 and 217, but that was due largely to the tactical brilliance of Lü Meng and the fact that Sun Quan concentrated his defenses there. The position was far more vulnerable in 223.

Farther downriver, a third Wei army under Cao Xiu attacked Dongpu (called Dongkou by the people of Wu), defended by Lü Fan. Like Ruxu, Dongpu was a fortified harbor, although it wasn’t as well positioned or as large s Ruxu. It did, however, represent a key crossing of the Yangzi, and control of Dongpu would be almost as beneficial as conquering Ruxu.

THE BATTLE OF DONGPU

Cao Xiu proceeded to Dongpu with an extremely large army consisting of some 20 divisions from Xu and Qing as well as a substantial fleet. Among his commanders were the renowned generals Zhang Liao and Zang Ba. In response, Sun Quan sent major reinforcements to Dongpu. Lü Fan was joined by the veteran generals Quan Zong, Xu Sheng, and Sun Shao. Additionally, the general He Qi was ordered to bring a naval force to reinforce Dongpu, but He Qi was stationed far away and was slow to arrive, much to the anger of his colleagues.

Cao Xiu initially proposed a highly aggressive strategy to Cao Pi. He wanted to lead an elite unit across the river and wreak havoc behind enemy lines, relying on raiding enemy positions for supplies. Cao Pi feared that this was too aggressive and doomed to failure, and he instructed Cao Xiu against it. Cao Xiu subsequently proceeded with a more measured strategy.

For several weeks, Cao Xiu attempted to use his navy to force a crossing. However, his ships were intercepted by Lü Fan’s subordinates, so Cao Xiu could make no headway. Still, all was not well within the Wu camp. Sun Quan’s half-brother Sun Lang was sent from Jianye with reinforcements, but he caused a shortage of supplies, damaging the war effort. Lü Fan dismissed him and sent him back to Jianye.

Far worse misfortune soon fell upon the defenders of Dongpu. A sudden storm struck the Wu fleet, sinking many of Lü Fan’s ships and driving others onto the northern shore. Cao Xiu was quick to seize this opportunity and attacked the isolated Wu forces. Xu Sheng was among the stranded, and he rallied the men to resist Cao Xiu. He managed to push Cao Xiu back and escape with a portion of the army, but Cao Xiu still managed to kill a significant number of the Wu soldiers.

In the wake of Lü Fan’s misfortune, Cao Xiu ordered his men across the river. Zang Ba led the assault, while Lü Fan took up a defensive position at Xuling. Zang Ba attacked the city, but he was held off by the efforts of Xu Sheng, Sun Shao, and Quan Zong, who were successful in destroying Zang Ba’s siege engines. Unable to take the city, Zang Ba withdrew. As he was retreating, Xu Sheng and Quan Zong led a their armies in pursuit. They caught Zang Ba at the edge of the river and dealt him a significant defeat, killing a general named Yi Lu.

While the Wei and Wu forces both regrouped, He Qi’s fleet finally arrived. Initially, he was harshly criticized by his colleagues. They accused him of deliberately arriving late so that he wouldn’t have to participate in the battle; an accusation that Chen Shou regards as false. Despite the anger of the other generals, He Qi’s delay proved fortuitous as his fleet suffered no damage from the storm. With these reinforcements, Lü Fan was able to secure his defensive line. Though Cao Xiu continued to pressure the Wu forces, Lü Fan’s defenses held. The battle for Dongpu continued, but the conclusion was already determined.

THE BATTLE OF RUXU

Despite being one of Wu’s most vital strategic points, Ruxu received the least aid from Sun Quan. It is probable that, after the victories earned by Lü Meng there in 213 and 217, Sun Quan was confident in the city’s defenses. Since 217, Ruxu had been under the command of Sun Quan’s trusted general Zhou Tai. However, Zhou Tai died just prior to Cao Pi’s invasion. Though control of his personal soldiers was passed to his son Zhou Shao, who distinguished himself in the subsequent campaign, command of Ruxu itself was granted to Zhu Huan.

Cao Ren began his attack by leaking misinformation, saying that he was going to attack Xianqi, a position east of Ruxu. Zhu Huan fell for this deception and sent a detachment to reinforce the position. Cao Ren had spies watching Zhu Huan’s movements, and when he saw that Ruxu’s defenses were reduced, he attacked. Zhu Huan learned of Cao Ren’s advance when he was about 18 miles from Ruxu. Though he sent riders to recall the detachment at Xianqi, there was no way for them to return before Cao Ren reached the city. Due to his own error, Zhu Huan was left with only some 5,000 men when Cao Ren attacked.

Zhu Huan’s soldiers were terrified, but he managed to rouse their spirits with a bold speech. Next, Zhu Huan set a trap of his own. He had most of his banners and drums put away in order to make his numbers look even lower than they actually were. Cao Ren was deceived and sent his son Cao Tai to attack the city.

There was a small islet within Ruxu’s waters where the wives and children of Ruxu’s officers lived. Cao Ren sent the generals Chang Diao and Wang Shuang to capture this islet. Cao Ren’s adviser Jiang Ji warned him against this attack, pointing out that the forces attacking the islet would be surrounded. However, Cao Ren chose not to follow this advice. He remained nearby to provide support from the rear while Cao Tai and Chang Diao advanced.

True to Jiang Ji’s prediction, the attack on islet was a disaster. Zhu Huan sent a subordinate to intercept Chang Diao while he himself held the walls against Cao Tai. Chang Diao was killed and Wang Shuang captured. In the face of this loss, Cao Tai withdrew.

As at Dongpu, the battle at Ruxu continued for the next several months. During that time, illness began to spread throughout Cao Ren’s camp, as often happened when the northern soldiers attacked Ruxu. Additionally, Zhu Huan’s men from Xiangqi were able to return and relive the city. Although Cao Ren continued to threaten the position, the worst of the danger had passed for Wu.

THE BATTLE OF JIANGLING

The largest engagement of the campaign took place at and around Jiangling. Cao Zhen commanded an army consisting of Wei’s western forces, including the generals Zhang He, Xu Huang, and Xiahou Shang. Jiangling itself was under the command of Zhu Ran, who received several waves of reinforcements from Zhuge Jin, Sun Sheng, Pan Zhang, and Yang Can. Although more armies were stationed nearby in Yiling, under Lu Xun’s command, they were unable to assist in the defense of Jiangling. After his defeat in the previous year, Liu Bei remained in Yong’an, just across the border between Wu and Shu. When Cao Pi attacked, Liu Bei sent a letter to Lu Xun threatening to invade as well. Although Lu Xun did not believe Liu Bei would do so, the threat of another attack from the west was sufficient to prevent Lu Xun from assisting Zhu Ran.

Before Wu’s reinforcements arrived, Cao Zhen encircled Jiangling. Unable to reached the city, the first wave of reinforcements, led by Sun Sheng, occupied an island in the river. He fortified his position and hoped to launch attacks from there to break the siege. In response, Cao Zhen dispatched Zhang He to capture the island. Zhang He stormed Sun Sheng’s position and crushed his army. He then occupied the island and used it as a staging area for further attacks.

The next wave of reinforcements was led by Zhuge Jin. Cao Zhen sent Xiahou Shang to intercept him. They camped on opposite sides of the river, each looking for an opening. Zhuge Jin advanced to an island in the river, hoping to press further and occupy the north bank so he could relive Jiangling. In response, Xiahou Shang dispatched men to the south bank. In the night, they attacked and burned Zhuge Jin’s fleet. At the same time, Xiahou Shang launched a naval assault. Assailed on land and water, Zhuge Jin was overwhelmed and forced to retreat.

Zhuge Jin’s defeat greatly unsettled the defenders at Jiangling, who were now totally isolated. Additionally, illness was spreading throughout the city, rendering many of the soldiers unfit for battle. Zhu Ran was left with only around 5,000 able men. Cao Zhen surrounded Jiangling with the usual earthworks and used siege towers to shoot arrows into the city. The situation was so dire that the magistrate of Jiangling, Yao Tai, planned to defect to Wei. Zhu Ran learned of his plans and executed him. Despite this, Zhu Ran remained resolute, and his defense was not a passive one. During the siege, Zhu Ran observed that two of Cao Zhen’s camps were disorganized and vulnerable. He led a bold sortie from the city and captured both of these camps, although this was not enough to relieve the pressure on Jiangling.

During this time, Zhang He and Xiahou Shang both occupied river islands. Xiahou Shang constructed pontoon bridges to the north and south, which allowed him to move his soldiers freely across the river. While this granted his soldiers freedom of movement, Cao Pi’s adviser Dong Zhao warned him that this also rendered Xiahou Shang extremely vulnerable, as his men were advancing along a clear route that was easily obstructed. Cao Pi accepted Dong Zhao’s warnings and ordered Xiahou Shang to desist.

Cao Pi’s orders came at just the right time. Zhuge Jin regrouped his army and, joined by Pan Zhang, advanced to relieve Jiangling again. Pan Zhang led a force some 13 miles upstream from Xiahou Shang’s position. There, he constructed rafts out of reeds. He planned to set fire to them and float them down the river, where they would reach and burn Xiahou Shang’s pontoon bridges. Cao Pi’s orders reached Xiahou Shang just before Pan Zhang was able to execute his plan, so Xiahou Shang withdrew to the north bank without incident.

The sickness suffered by those in Jiangling appears to have spread to the Wei army as well. In summer, Cao Pi withdrew to Luoyang, although Cao Zhen remained in the field and continued the siege of Jiangling. Despite successes in the field against the various waves of Wu reinforcements, the Wei army was unable to break through Zhu Ran’s defenses and capture the city. The siege lasted until the sixth month of the year. Noting the lack of success at Dongpu, Ruxu, and Jiangling, as well as the sickness spreading throughout the armies, Cao Pi recognized that his campaign had failed. At last he ordered a full retreat of his armies.

With his victory during the Great River Campaign, Sun Quan established Wu’s independence from Wei. Although Cao Pi led two more attacks against Wu, neither approached the scale of this first invasion. The victorious defending generals instantly became Sun Quan’s top officers and influenced both military and civil affairs for the remainder of their lives. This decisive victory confirmed Wu’s control over Jing, and after this the boundaries of the Three Kingdoms did not appreciably change until Wei’s conquest of Shu four decades later.

August 04 2017

daolunofshiji:

the-archlich:

daolunofshiji:

the-archlich:

daolunofshiji:

His heir was Cao Tai, who reached the position of General who Guards the East, and who was giving the jie honors and the Marquisate of Ningling. When Cao Tai died, his son Cao Chu inherited the Marquisate. Cao Tai’s younger brothers Cao Kai and Cao Fan were both made marquis, and Niu Jin was eventually promoted to the position of General of the Rear.

Why is Niu Jin listed here…? They aren’t related. Odd…

Is it a personal guard sort of thing?

Zhou Yu came to attack the city with several tens of thousands of men, and a vanguard several thousand in strength. Cao Ren observed their approach from the top of the city walls, and thereupon he recruited three hundred men and had his subordinate Niu Jin lead them to confront the enemy. However, the enemy was many, and Niu Jin’s men were few, and quickly they were surrounded. At that time, many of the officers, including the Chief Clerk, Chen Qiao, were on the city walls; seeing that Niu Jin’s men disappearing in the multitudes of the enemy they all stood aghast. Cao Ren, in a great fury, ordered his men to bring his horse. Chen Qiao and others held his horse and said, “The enemy is strong, and it would be futile to fight them now. How bad can it be, to lose a few hundred men, compared to putting yourself in risk in battle?” Cao Ren did not reply, and donning his armor he mounted his horse, and led some tens of his most valiant riders out of the city. The riders were a hundred-odd paces away from the melee when they approached the moat. Chen Qiao and others all thought that Cao Ren should halt there to be backup support for Niu Jin, but Cao Ren instead rode straight on, fording the moat, and charging into the encirclement. Thus Niu Jin was able to escape, but some of his men were still trapped. And so Cao Ren charged back into the melee and saved the rest of Niu Jin’s men; several of them were lost. The enemy retreated at that.

I guess when you go to those lengths for a guy, Chen Shou says you’re pretty much family.

I have always found it odd that Niu Jin doesn’t have an SGZ bio, or even anything substantial from supplemental material. He was favored by both Cao Ren and Sima Yi and eventually held one of the highest positions in Wei’s army; you’d think his life story would be worth writing down.

Ah Cao Ren’s amazing ballsyness… I love that man. I guess that does make sense, that is the sort of thing a person would do for their family. 

Seems the only information you can get on the guy is from Cao Ren’s actual SGZ. That’s a real shame.

He’s mentioned a few times in Sima Yi’s SGZ, as one of his generals in the west. Most notably, he defeated an invasion led by Ma Dai in 236 because Sima Yi couldn’t be assed to do it himself.

There’s also the rumor that he’s SIma Rui’s real father, but this was obviously just an attempt by Northern Wei to delegitimize Eastern Jin by claiming that their founding emperor was not actually a Sima.

Weird that Niu Jin got picked for that.

Is there a translation of Sima Yi’s SGZ? All I can find is his ZZTJ, not that I am complaining since it’s 10 miles long, but it leaves out Niu Jin entirely. 

But that is really odd he’d be picked out of everyone to be the slanderous father. At least with the whole Yuan Xi being Cao Rui’s father slander, it has some reason behind it since he and Lady Zhen were married. It’s obvious garbage, but at least picking him makes sense over, say, Yang Biao.

His biography is JS, not SGZ; but there’s no full English translation either way (as far as I know; I’d be really embarrassed if I missed something like that).

I (and others) have translated a few passages on an as-needed basis.

Niu Jin is mentioned a couple times (along with Fei Yao and Dai Ling) during Sima Yi’s time in the west.

daolunofshiji:

the-archlich:

daolunofshiji:

His heir was Cao Tai, who reached the position of General who Guards the East, and who was giving the jie honors and the Marquisate of Ningling. When Cao Tai died, his son Cao Chu inherited the Marquisate. Cao Tai’s younger brothers Cao Kai and Cao Fan were both made marquis, and Niu Jin was eventually promoted to the position of General of the Rear.

Why is Niu Jin listed here…? They aren’t related. Odd…

Is it a personal guard sort of thing?

Zhou Yu came to attack the city with several tens of thousands of men, and a vanguard several thousand in strength. Cao Ren observed their approach from the top of the city walls, and thereupon he recruited three hundred men and had his subordinate Niu Jin lead them to confront the enemy. However, the enemy was many, and Niu Jin’s men were few, and quickly they were surrounded. At that time, many of the officers, including the Chief Clerk, Chen Qiao, were on the city walls; seeing that Niu Jin’s men disappearing in the multitudes of the enemy they all stood aghast. Cao Ren, in a great fury, ordered his men to bring his horse. Chen Qiao and others held his horse and said, “The enemy is strong, and it would be futile to fight them now. How bad can it be, to lose a few hundred men, compared to putting yourself in risk in battle?” Cao Ren did not reply, and donning his armor he mounted his horse, and led some tens of his most valiant riders out of the city. The riders were a hundred-odd paces away from the melee when they approached the moat. Chen Qiao and others all thought that Cao Ren should halt there to be backup support for Niu Jin, but Cao Ren instead rode straight on, fording the moat, and charging into the encirclement. Thus Niu Jin was able to escape, but some of his men were still trapped. And so Cao Ren charged back into the melee and saved the rest of Niu Jin’s men; several of them were lost. The enemy retreated at that.

I guess when you go to those lengths for a guy, Chen Shou says you’re pretty much family.

I have always found it odd that Niu Jin doesn’t have an SGZ bio, or even anything substantial from supplemental material. He was favored by both Cao Ren and Sima Yi and eventually held one of the highest positions in Wei’s army; you’d think his life story would be worth writing down.

Ah Cao Ren’s amazing ballsyness… I love that man. I guess that does make sense, that is the sort of thing a person would do for their family. 

Seems the only information you can get on the guy is from Cao Ren’s actual SGZ. That’s a real shame.

He’s mentioned a few times in Sima Yi’s SGZ, as one of his generals in the west. Most notably, he defeated an invasion led by Ma Dai in 236 because Sima Yi couldn’t be assed to do it himself.

There’s also the rumor that he’s SIma Rui’s real father, but this was obviously just an attempt by Northern Wei to delegitimize Eastern Jin by claiming that their founding emperor was not actually a Sima.

Weird that Niu Jin got picked for that.

daolunofshiji:

His heir was Cao Tai, who reached the position of General who Guards the East, and who was giving the jie honors and the Marquisate of Ningling. When Cao Tai died, his son Cao Chu inherited the Marquisate. Cao Tai’s younger brothers Cao Kai and Cao Fan were both made marquis, and Niu Jin was eventually promoted to the position of General of the Rear.

Why is Niu Jin listed here…? They aren’t related. Odd…

Is it a personal guard sort of thing?

Zhou Yu came to attack the city with several tens of thousands of men, and a vanguard several thousand in strength. Cao Ren observed their approach from the top of the city walls, and thereupon he recruited three hundred men and had his subordinate Niu Jin lead them to confront the enemy. However, the enemy was many, and Niu Jin’s men were few, and quickly they were surrounded. At that time, many of the officers, including the Chief Clerk, Chen Qiao, were on the city walls; seeing that Niu Jin’s men disappearing in the multitudes of the enemy they all stood aghast. Cao Ren, in a great fury, ordered his men to bring his horse. Chen Qiao and others held his horse and said, “The enemy is strong, and it would be futile to fight them now. How bad can it be, to lose a few hundred men, compared to putting yourself in risk in battle?” Cao Ren did not reply, and donning his armor he mounted his horse, and led some tens of his most valiant riders out of the city. The riders were a hundred-odd paces away from the melee when they approached the moat. Chen Qiao and others all thought that Cao Ren should halt there to be backup support for Niu Jin, but Cao Ren instead rode straight on, fording the moat, and charging into the encirclement. Thus Niu Jin was able to escape, but some of his men were still trapped. And so Cao Ren charged back into the melee and saved the rest of Niu Jin’s men; several of them were lost. The enemy retreated at that.

I guess when you go to those lengths for a guy, Chen Shou says you’re pretty much family.

I have always found it odd that Niu Jin doesn’t have an SGZ bio, or even anything substantial from supplemental material. He was favored by both Cao Ren and Sima Yi and eventually held one of the highest positions in Wei’s army; you’d think his life story would be worth writing down.

Is is possible that we haven’t seen any Jin characters yet because KT hasn’t actually done that part of the game yet?

The first announcements came about two months ago, when they said they were about 40% done. Is it possible that that remaining 60% includes literally all the Jin characters?

lol just realized that Xu Sheng ended up shipwrecked on enemy shores twice. At Ruxu in 217 and Dongpu in 223. And both times managed to rally enough resistance to drive off his attackers and lead the survivors to safety.

Once is impressive. Twice is a curse.

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